©2019 by ArtGainz. 

  • artgainz

God is a Nationalist


"The Tower of Babel" by Tobias Verhaecht (1561-1631).

Although it might seem hyperbolic to make this claim, a straightforward interpretation of the scriptures indicates that God is a nationalist, or rather that He delights in the propagation of nations and despises what we call globalism. It is reasonable to deduce that God delights in the beautiful and near-infinite variety of nations that the human race is capable of producing, and He does not want them to merge back together.


One of the first stories in the Bible is about how the first two nations, the Sons of Cain and the Sons of Seth, began to merge back together into one heterogeneous mass, a kind of proto-globalist movement. They became so evil and so powerful that God had to purge the earth with water to put an end to it.


The nations that arose after the Flood then grouped together in another globalist movement, working together to build the Tower of Babel, which symbolized both their defiance against God and their ability to find unity without God. This was such an affront to God that He supernaturally confounded their languages, after which they could no longer live or work together.


Globalism, or anti-nationalism, is such an affront to God, a gateway to such evil and such powerful self-delusion, that He is willing to engage in supernatural interference to prevent it from happening.


***


One of the blessings that God promised to Abraham was that he would be the father of many nations. The proliferation of nations is therefore a good thing.


The Bible repeatedly alludes to the disappearance of nations as a horrible thing, yet Globalists and Cultural Marxists aim to eradicate the nations by merging them all together, as if this were a desirable goal.


***


It is truly bizarre to see Christians and Classical Liberals pontificating about how they don’t care about the continuation of their nation just so long as their “ideas” survive. All their ancestors from Adam are rolling in their graves.